How Much of Your Music Have You Paid For?

FBI, piracy, Remix, Lawrence Lessig

from FBI.gov website


Today, my sis and I talk Disney, Remix Culture, and our documentary project, The Mushroom Hunter.  Podcast published Tuesday. Audience interest generation today.

Would you vote and tell me about your Twitter use?

[dc]T[/dc]
his post is for anyone who thinks they might want to try out Twitter, or perhaps, anyone who could use a set of instructions to pass along to students.

Social Media, Education, NCTE, Writing, Digital literacy

The handout to my instructions are here, or you can just read them below:

  1. Consider if you’d like for people to know who you are on Twitter.  I’m “BillTorg” and that’s pretty obviously me.  If I’m “EightiesDude,” then maybe it’s harder to figure out who I am.
  2. Twitter messages are limited to 140 characters.  The longer your name, the less room you and others have to exchange messages.  So “BillTorg” works better for me than “WilliamJosephTorgerson.”
  3. You will be asked to write a short bio for yourself.  Think about what it will say.  Some people’s are silly.  My sister’s is, “What’s on the what what?” Mine explains my job and what I do. I tinker with it quite a bit.
  4. You can link to your Twitter account to another site. Perhaps your Facebook page?
  5. Click on the Twitter link on the classroom website.  It’s Twitter.com
  6. Fill out the “New to Twitter” box.  Complete the steps.  Let me know if there’s additional directions I should have listed here.
  7. I’m @BillTorg on Twitter.  If you tweet and follow me and tell me that you followed these directions, I’ll follow you back. If you don’t know how to do that, there will be another set of directions coming right up.
  8. There’s a lot more you can do with color and customizing your background.  Experiment.

A more sophisticated set of instructions is coming right up.  Love to hear your feedback on this handout and what else you might find useful.



 

Who Will the Students Follow on Twitter?

NCTE_Twitter
The idea is that my students will follow tweeters within a topic that interests them. This worries me in that I’m sure I’ll have lots of Yankee fans who will automatically want to follow the team’s outfielder and frequent tweeter, Nick Swisher. I don’t object to students following Swisher, but as far as the class goes, I want the students to ask themselves a few questions:

  • Why am I a student at St. John’s?
  • What am I interested in learning about?
  • What are my intellectual curiosities?
  • What’s my plan when it comes to the reading and writing I will do in this class?

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Given those questions, who do the students think they should follow? If the student aspires to be a Yankee beat reporter, then maybe Nick Swisher is perfect. If the student hopes to work in finance or publishing, perhaps they should find someone else to follow.

Take for example a former student of mine who is a speech pathology major. While getting ready for a panel discussion, she and I happened on wondering about putting “speech pathology” in the Twitter search box. Among the screen full of tweets that contained the phrase from the past few hours of tweets, we saw a posting by a speech pathologist about a job opening in her office. This is not the first time a student and I have stumbled mostly by accident onto something that works well. When this happens, I try to take notice and organize an environment where this good thing is more likely to happen. Because of this particular moment with a student in my office, I want to have students identify tweeters in their area of interest and see what they find. I know they will find something. Maybe more of them will find leads on an internship or job opportunity.

I know from experience that when I tweet and read tweets, I find many teachers using technology in interesting ways. I imagine if I was a basketball coach, I’d find coaches tweeting about game strategy. Well, I don’t have to imagine too hard: St. John’s University’s own Coach Lavin is a regular tweeter. I’m confident that a student writing about studying abroad could find other students tweeting about a similar experience. Do you see any potential problems with this? Do you have ideas of your own for using Twitter in the classroom?
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